Posts Tagged ‘ Michael Pollan ’

michael pollan.

From Michael Pollan’s new book, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, this (amazing) author on nutrition and food was on Dr. Oz and he had some stuff to say.

Who’s cooking your food? Corporations or people? Corporations are using the cheapest, worst ingredients and dress it up with salt, fat and sugar.

Get back into the kitchen and rekindle your love for cooking. If you do this, you don’t have to worry about counting calories or agonizing over getting enough nutrients, how much fat your taking in, etc. It figures itself out when you’re cooking, just in practice alone.

We’re being brainwashed into thinking we are incapable of cooking. Think about the companies selling you frozen peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. That’s ridiculous. The most simple food to make, but hey, we make it better and easier for you. But is it?

Pollan’s new FOOD RULES:

WATER: where does flavor come from? You can make the best flavors just by cooking food slowly in water. Dashi, a Japanese stock, makes everything amazing. You add kombu to your cooking water and remove before it boils. Benito flakes is a great add-on (fish and mushroom).

AIR: you cannot live on wheat flour alone. But you can live on bread. Buy your bread from a baker not a factory. If it does not go stale in a couple days it is not REAL bread.

EARTH: fermented food is super important. Basically eat from the earth. Live, fermented food. Kimchi, sauerkraut, wine, cheese…

FIRE: No no no on microwaves. This is not fire, so don’t use it. Think about when you cook on a grill, everyone is attracted to it giving it a sense of community. Do you do that with microwaves? Nope, it’s quite the obvious.

Here is Michael Pollan’s grocery cheat sheet list:

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Food Rules

The other day a friend of mine let me borrow Food Rules, an amazing eater’s manual by Michael Pollan. From the moment I opened the book I was captivated and ended up reading it very quickly. Usually I don’t like books that are extreme or ones that have strong opinions, I think it’s because my patience for anything drastically skewed or unnecessarily extremely opinionated just rubs me the wrong way. I believe in being moderate, thinking fairly and accurately, being reasonable and realistic. And Pollan does a fantastic job in doing just that. He presents his findings in such a way that are easy to digest. I also find that his rules are readily adoptable and applying them to your diet is easily doable. There are many things in the book that are common sense-type rules but things that we’ve learned to forget over the years as eaters in America. Being that he is a journalist, his job is to make complicated things easy to understand, and he makes a very confusing thing (eating food) very simple to grasp. In any case, I found his book very interesting and I think everyone should really read it. It will change how you view and consume food (in a good way). The end result for me: I want to live healthy so I must put pure/good/whole food into my body, and the way to do that? Good food, right food, happy food… The rules make it easy.

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